Seeing clearly

Readings for March 3, 2019

Sirach 27:4-7
Psalm 92
1 Corinthians 15:54-58
Luke 6:39-45

www.usccb.org/bible/readings/

“Can a blind person guide a blind person? Will not both fall into the pit?” Jesus uses the analogy of physical blindness to warn us of spiritual blindness. He is telling us that we need people in our lives who are able to see God’s hand in the world and who understand what He wants us to do. Here, Jesus is calling us to be able to see with our hearts and not just our eyes, and to let that guide how we live. I am blessed to have seen this play out in my own life.

When my nephew was 5-years-old he was diagnosed with a degenerative eye disease that would rob him of his central vision. My brother and his wife were understandably devastated. They feared for his safety, wondered how his life would be impacted, and wondered what it meant for their family. But for all of his fears, and all of his research, and all of his questions, my brother could not will his son to see. Instead, he had to learn to see what his son already saw through the blurring of the shapes and objects around him: that his life was still the same joyous gift it had always been.

As my nephew has demonstrated throughout the duration of his vision loss, only when we see clearly can we praise God in all things. Now a high school senior, he is a student athlete, an avid skier, has completed an Ironman triathlon, and speaks to other young people on behalf of his own foundation. He knows what he sees. The limits put upon him by his blindness are not limitations for his life. My nephew, in his own words, chooses to focus on “POSSIBILITY instead of DISABILITY.”

My brother had to remove the plank from his own eyes to see clearly what God had placed into his life. He and his wife had to, and still have to, overcome fear for their son’s safety in order to experience the joys of life. But soon they saw what my nephew saw all along–that the progression of his eye disease, the corruptibility of that which is mortal,  did not bring about a death, but rather, “death was swallowed up in victory.” While my nephew has lost most of his sight he remains steadfast in his vision for life.

So, if indeed “faith is the realization of things hoped for and the evidence of things unseen” (Hebrews 11:1), then I can see all things through the eyes of faith. And I can bear good fruit from that faith, following the guidance of my nephew. “Thanks be to God who gives us victory through our Lord, Jesus Christ.”

“Whether you are blind, sighted, struggling, or thriving, God is always there to guide you. Find God in those around you and in the beautiful little things we take so much advantage of.
‘So do not fear, for I am with you; do not be dismayed, for I am your God. I will strengthen you and help you; I will uphold you with my righteous right hand.’
Isaiah 41:10”
-Carmella McGee, visionary guide, chief cheerleader, fearless sister, and member, Louie’s Vision board of directors
www.louiesvision.com

9 thoughts on “Seeing clearly

  1. Wow!

    What a Beautiful expression of Faith, Hope and Love. And the GREATEST of these is LOVE.

    When God closes a door, He usually always open a window {of opportunity.}

    Thank you for sharing this story of Faith and courage,

    May Jesus THROUGH Mary continue to intercede for this young man, his parents and you and your family Tim,

    Patrick

    Liked by 2 people

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